News from Nanotechjapan

ライフ・医療

A novel injectable in vivo imaging probe for detecting the intratumoral activity of proteins

 On October 18, 2016, Tokyo Institute of Technology announced that a collaborative research group led by Professor Shinae Kizaka-Kondoh has succeeded in developing a noninvasive in vivo optical imaging probe for detecting the intratumoral activity of proteins.  Details were published in Scientific Reports *.

 Protein with HIF (Hypoxia-Inducible Factor, Hypoxia: oxygen deficiency in blood) activity is a promising target molecule to identify the position of cancer during treatment or for a marker of cancer diagnostics. However, noninvasive in vivo optical imaging of HIF active cells has been quite difficult.

 The research group has developed an injectable NIR-BRET (Near-Infra-Red Bioluminescence-Resonance-Energy-Transfer) imaging probe for detecting the HIF activity. NIR light of the 702 nm wavelength signals are highly penetrable in biological tissues, achieving a high target-to-background (T/B) ratio of approximately 10. By injecting the imaging probe into tumor-bearing mice, they achieved highly specific and fast (1 hour after the probe injection) detection of intratumoral HIF activity in various cancer models including liver metastasis.

 The HIF imaging probe is expected to contribute to the exploration of HIF roles in animal disease models.

* Takahiro Kuchimaru, Tomoya Suka, Keisuke Hirota, Tetsuya Kadonosono, Shinae Kizaka-Kondoh, "A novel injectable BRET-based in vivo imaging probe for detecting the activity of hypoxia-inducible factor regulated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system", Scientific Reports, Vol. 6, Article number: 34311 (2016), doi: 10.1038/srep34311; Published online: 04 October 2016